Feast Day of Saint Edward

October 13 is the feast day of St. Edward the Confessor. King Edward of England was born in 1003 and died 5 January, 1066. In the royal “yours, mine, and ours,” he was the half brother of the then-King of England, Edmund, and the future King Hardicanute.

Early misfortune thus taught Edward the folly of ambition, and he grew up in innocence, delighting chiefly in assisting at Mass and other church offices, but not disdaining the pleasures of the chase (hunting) or recreations suited to his station.

Upon Hardicanute’s sudden death in 1042, Edward was called to the throne at the age of about forty. His reign was one of almost unbroken peace and internal difficulties were settled without bloodshed by Edward’s gentleness and prudence.

Devoid of personal ambition, Edward’s one aim was the welfare of his people. He remitted heavy tax laws and gave profusely to the poor. Such was the contentment caused by “the good St. Edward’s laws”, that their enactment was demanded by later generations, when they felt themselves oppressed, and they formed the basis of the English Constitution.

10-13-18

This image is a section of the Bayeux tapestry, nearly 70 meters (230 feet) long and 50 cm (20 inches) high which depicts the events leading up to the Norman conquest of England. It is thought to date to the 11th century.

Since 1729 it has resided in the Musée de la Tapisserie de Bayeux in Bayeux, Normandy, France, but experts now agree that it was probably made in England. On January 18, 2018 French President Emmanuel Macron announced that the Bayeux Tapestry would be loaned to Britain for public display in the British Museum in 2022. It will be the first time that it has left France in 950 years.


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