Postal Workers and Postage Stamp Day in the United States

July 1 is Postal Workers and Postage Stamp Day in the United State. On July 1, 1847, the first federal United States postage stamps were issued in New York City. A five-cent stamp pictured Ben Franklin, and one costing 10 cents honored George Washington. Before then there were no uniform stamps — a haphazard system of private postal services issued their own stamps.

Fast forward to July 1, 1963. The five digit ZIP Code was introduced to help speed mail to its proper destination. That year 35 million pieces of first class mail were delivered in the United States. Mail volume peaked in 2001, with 103 million pieces. Since that time, with the advent of email and other online transactions, first class mail delivery has declined to 54 million in 2019. (USPS)

The First U.S. Postage Stamps, issued 1847. The first stamp issues were authorized by an act of Congress and approved on March 3, 1847. The earliest known use of the Franklin 5¢ is July 7, 1847, while the earliest known use of the Washington 10¢ is July 2, 1847. Remaining in postal circulation for only a few years, these issues were declared invalid for postage on July 1, 1851.

The First U.S. Postage Stamps, issued 1847. The first stamp issues were authorized by an act of Congress and approved on March 3, 1847. The earliest known use of the Franklin 5¢ is July 7, 1847, while the earliest known use of the Washington 10¢ is July 2, 1847. Remaining in postal circulation for only a few years, these issues were declared invalid for postage on July 1, 1851.

Disclaimer: The information on this website is accurate to the best of my knowledge at the time of writing. I make no guarantee as to its accuracy. Its purpose is to inform, educate, amuse, and raise awareness about causes and opportunities around the globe. I also encourage civil debate in the comments.

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